Georgia Tech

WST and HTS Women’s Awareness Month Talk

Event Details

Date/Time:

  • Monday, March 4, 2013 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Clary Theatre, Success Center

Deboleena Roy is Director of the Women's Studies Program and Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology at Emory University.  She received her Ph.D. in reproductive neuroendocrinology and molecular biology in 2001 from the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto. In her doctoral work, she examined the effects of estrogen and melatonin on the gene expression and cell signaling mechanisms in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons of the hypothalamus.  Her areas of interest include feminist science and technology studies, feminist theory, philosophy of science, sexuality studies, neuroethics, molecular and synthetic biology, and reproductive justice movements.  Her research and scholarship attempts to make a shift from feminist critiques of science to the creation of feminist practices that can contribute to scientific inquiry in the lab. 

She has published her work in journals such as Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy; American Journal of Bioethics; Neuroethics; Australian Feminist Studies; Rhizomes: Cultural Studies of Emerging Knowledge; Endocrinology; Neuroendocrinology; and the Journal of Biological Chemistry.  She has contributed chapters to the anthologies Handbook for Feminist Research: Theory and Praxis (2011) and Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science (2012).  Roy was a faculty research fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University from September 2008 – June 2009.  While at the institute, she developed a project in feminist neuroethics and is currently working on a manuscript entitled “Mapping Gender, Hormones, and Neurons: Feminist Configurations in the Neurosciences.”  In 2010, she received a grant from the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative (NAKFI) for her project entitled “Developing a Benchside Ethics and Community-Based Participatory Research Training Program in Synthetic Biology.”  This interdisciplinary training program brought together graduate students in biology, bioengineering, philosophy and women’s studies to discuss the ethical and social implications of synthetic biology research.