Georgia Tech

Energy Efficiency Opportunities–Best Practices in the South

Event Details

Date/Time:

  • Wednesday, March 27, 2013 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Location: Hodges Room, Centergy Building
Fee(s): None

McKinsey and Company has stated that energy efficiency offers a vast, low-cost energy resource for the U.S. economy—but only if the nation can craft a comprehensive and innovative approach to unlock it. When accomplished at scale, the potential benefits from energy efficiency are huge: savings of over 2X the capital investment, reduction of 23 percent of projected energy demand through 2020, and abatement of 1.1 gigatons of greenhouse gases annually.

Of the regions in the U.S., the Southeast has the greatest opportunities for savings. What strategies for improved energy efficiency work today or could work in the near future for this region–timely capital investment, creative tariffs/rates for utilities for energy efficiency practices, and effective demand measurement?

Panelists include:

Mandy Mahoney, President, Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA)—Prior to joining SEEA Mahoney served as the Director of Sustainability for the City of Atlanta under Mayors Reed and Franklin. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for Georgia Organics, the Atlanta Chapter of Ducks Unlimited, Green Chamber of the South and the Caretta Environmental Leadership Award. 

Jim Kennerly, Regulatory & Policy Analyst, North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association (NCSEA)— Jim is primarily responsible for the evaluation of existing and proposed policies intended to maintain and/or expand access to affordable clean energy. In addition, Jim is an energy efficiency, demand-side management and regulated utility subject matter expert.

Huiet Joseph, Manager, Energy Conservation, Cox Enterprises, Inc.—Huiet is responsible for executing strategies, initiatives and capital projects to reduce Cox’s carbon footprint. He and his team have installed over 160 energy conservation and water conservation projects, eliminating thousands of tons of carbon, and saving millions of gallons of water. 

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