Georgia Tech

College of Architecture’s Professor Emeritus Douglas Allen Named Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects

Jul 19, 2013 | Atlanta, GA

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Lisa Herrmann

Director of Communications

College of Architecture

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Professor Emeritus Douglas Allen, a longtime member of the faculty at the College of Architecture, has been named to the Council of Fellows in the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA).  Among the highest honors the ASLA awards, this year 33 members were elevated to the Council of Fellows, recognizing them for their contributions to their profession and society at large based on their works, leadership and management, knowledge, and service. The 2013 class of fellows will be recognized at the 2013 ASLA Annual Meeting in November in Boston.

“This is quite an extraordinary accomplishment, and it couldn’t go to a more deserving individual,” said Steve French, dean of the College of Architecture. “Doug has played an instrumental role in the leadership of both the College and in the field of architecture over the years, it’s fantastic that the Georgia Chapter of the ASLA recognized his contributions and nominated him for this honor. We here at Georgia Tech are proud to call him a colleague.”

Doug Allen has been at Georgia Tech for 36 years, much of that time as the only landscape architect in the College of Architecture. He not only continues to teach classes in landscape architecture and urban design, but co-created and remains instrumental in the College’s study abroad program in Greece and Italy, now in its 20th year.  In addition, he served as associate dean of the College from 2002 to 2011 and interim dean from 2007 to 2008. He holds a bachelor of landscape architecture from the University of Georgia and a master’s in landscape architecture from Harvard University.

Founded in 1899, the ASLA is the national professional association for landscape architects, representing more than 15,000 members in 49 professional chapters and 68 student chapters. The Society's mission is to lead, educate, and participate in the careful stewardship, wise planning, and artful design of our cultural and natural environments.